Articles

Making A Cake Or Roofing A House – It's All In The Layers

Much of the United States experiences extremes in weather conditions. If you're in the "snow belt" you get plenty of the white stuff piled on your roof, with perhaps a touch of freezing rain. The Pacific Northwest is subject to torrential rains, mostly in the fall and winter, but anything can happen. If you are in the market for a new roof, it pays to know the layers needed to keep your home warm and dry.

Understanding Roofing Papers & How They Can Be Repaired

If you live in a hind wind area, then you may know that winds in your area reach a five, six, or seven on the Beaufort scale. This means that wind speeds are likely to reach speeds that are up to 50 or 60 miles per hour. While most asphalt shingles are rated to withstand these strong wind speeds, you may notice some significant damage across your roof if a fast moving branch hits your home.